Courses

This course covers the work period of electrical engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program.

Practical work experience in industry or a research lab under the supervision of an engineer or scientist, summer only.

Presentations by speakers from industry, government, academia, and professional private practice. Topics include environmental and other ethical concerns, safety awareness, quality management, technical career descriptions, and professionalism.

Presentations by speakers from industry, government, academia, and professional private practice. Topics include environmental and other ethical concerns, safety awareness, quality management, technical career descriptions, and professionalism.

Elective course open to upper-division students in electrical engineering for original investigation of special problems approved by the department.

This course covers the work period of electrical engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program.

This course covers the work period of electrical engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. The student must complete Electrical Engineering 225MA and 225MB before a grade and degree credit are awarded.

Elective course open to upper-division students in electrical engineering for original investigation of special problems approved by the department.

The scope and nature of professional activities of electrical engineers, including problem-solving techniques; analysis and design methods; engineering professional ethics; analysis of analog resistive circuits, including Thevenin/Norton equivalents, mesh analysis, and nodal analysis; and operational amplifiers (DC response).

The scope and nature of professional activities of electrical and computer engineers, including problem-solving techniques, analysis, and design methods.

Motivated, bottom-up introduction to computing; bits and operations on bits; number formats; arithmetic and logic operations; digital logic; the Von Neumann model of processing, including memory, arithmetic logic unit, registers, and instruction decoding and execution; introduction to structured programming and debugging; machine and assembly language programming; the structure of an assembler; physical input/output through device registers; subroutine call/return; trap instruction; stacks and applications of stacks.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Analysis, design, and construction of a solar-powered car for national competitions involving other universities. Study of electrical, mechanical, and aerodynamic systems.

Basic problem solving, design and implementation techniques for imperative programming; structured programming in the C/C++ language; programming idioms; introduction to software design principles, including modularity, coupling and cohesion; introduction to software engineering tools; elementary data structures; asymptotic analysis.

Representation of signals and systems; system properties; sampling; Laplace and z-transforms; transfer functions and frequency response; convolution; stability; Fourier transform; feedback; and control applications.

Boolean algebra; analysis and design of combinational and sequential logic circuits; state machine design and state tables and graphs; simulation of combinational and sequential circuits; applications to computer design; and introduction to hardware description languages (HDLs) and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs).

Embedded systems; machine language execution; assembly and C language programming; local variables and subroutines; input/output synchronization; analog to digital conversion and digital to analog conversion; debugging; and interrupts.

Digital and analog parametric testing of mixed-signal circuits and systems, including frequency response, harmonic and intermodulation, and noise behavior

Electrostatics and magnetostatics; properties of conductive, dielectric, and magnetic materials; solutions of Maxwell's equations; uniform plane wave applications; frequency- and time-domain analyses of transmission lines.

Solutions of time-varying Maxwell's equations with applications to antennas and wireless propagation; antenna theory and design, array synthesis; electromagnetic wave propagation, scattering, and diffraction; numerical methods for solving Maxwell's equations.

This course covers the work period of electrical and computer engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. Forty laboratory hours a week for three semesters. The student must complete Electrical Engineering 325LX325LY, and 325LZ before a grade and degree credit are awarded. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: For 325LX, application to become a member of the Cooperative Engineering Program, approval of the dean, and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LYElectrical Engineering 325LX and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LZElectrical Engineering 325LY and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour.

Not open to electrical engineering majors. Brief theory of direct and alternating current circuits; single-phase and three-phase power transmission; electronic devices and instrumentation; electromechanics.

Advanced engineering communication skills, with emphasis on technical documents, oral reports, and graphics; collaborative work involving online communication and research.

Introduction to quantum mechanics; atoms and molecules; electron statistics; quantum theory of solids; electronic phenomena in semiconductors; and device applications based on these phenomena.

Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits; transistor models; simple and advanced current mirrors; single-ended amplifiers; differential amplifiers; operational amplifiers; frequency response; feedback theory; stability analysis; circuit nonidealities and noise; output stages; analog filters. CAD tools for circuit analysis and design.

Semiconductor materials; atomic orbitals to energy band structure of semiconductors; charge carrier transport, electron-hole generation and recombination; p-n junctions and Schottky barriers; bipolar and filed-effect transistors; and introduction to optoelectronic devices.

Fundamentals of electric machines. Electromechanical energy conversion; magnetic circuits, transformers, and energy conversion devices; and an introduction to power electronics. Motor drive fundamentals and applications.

Modern optical wave phenomena with applications to imaging, holography, fiber optics, lasers, and optical information processing.

Principles of operation and applications of lasers, optical modulators, and optical detectors.

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 339 with a grade of at least C-.

Meets with EE 396V.

Probability, random variables, statistics, and random processes, including counting, independence, conditioning, expectation, density functions, distributions, law of large numbers, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, statistical estimation, stationary processes, Markov chains, and ergodicity.

Sampling, aliasing, truncation effects; discrete and fast Fourier transform methods; convolution and deconvolution; finite and infinite impulse response filter design methods; Wiener, Kalman, noncausal, linear phase, median, and prediction filters; and spectral estimation.

Elective course open to upper-division students in electrical engineering for original investigation of special problems approved by the department.

Advanced problem solving methods; algorithm design principles; complexity analysis; study of the nature, impact, and handling of intractability; study of common algorithmic classes and their applications.

Introduction to the discipline of software engineering. Includes software system creation and evolution; fundamental concepts and principles of software product and software process systems, including requirements, architecture and design, construction, deployment, and maintenance; and documentation and document management, measurement and evaluation, software evolution, teamwork, and project management.

Communication channels and their impairments; modulation; demodulation; probability-of-error analysis; source coding; error control coding; link budget analysis; equalization; synchronization and multiple access; spread spectrum; applications in wireline and wireless communication systems.

Multithreaded programming, semaphores, monitors, lock-free synchronization, resource allocation; client/server distributed systems programming, logical clocks, global snapshots and property evaluation, leader election, consensus, protection, and transactions.

Circuit-level aspects of metal oxide silicon (MOS) and bipolar integrated circuit technologies. Logic gates and latches; propagation delays; circuit simulation models. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Basic concepts and techniques used in testing software and finding bugs. Includes process, unit, integration, and system testing; manual and automatic techniques for generation of test inputs and validation of test outputs; and coverage criteria. Focus on functional testing.

Survey of engineering design, manufacturing, and lifetime support issues; implications of customer perceptions of quality on design; economics of design; legal implications of design decisions. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Goals, methods, and applications of data mining.

Methods and technology for acquiring, representing, documenting, verifying, validating, and maintaining requirements; text-based, graphic-based, and computational requirements model representations; requirements analysis to synthesize and resolve conflicts among disparate stakeholder viewpoints; requirements traceability and evolution, and change management.

Modeling of active and passive devices and transmission line structures at high frequencies.

Analysis of linear automatic control systems in time and frequency domains; stability analysis; state variable analysis of continuous-time and discrete-time systems; root locus; Nyquist diagrams; Bode plots; sensitivity; lead and lag compensation.

Introduction to and analysis of power quality and harmonic phenomena in electric power systems. Includes characteristics and definitions, voltage sags, electrical transients, harmonics, mitigation techniques, and standards of power quality and harmonics.

Introduction to renewable energy sources and their integration into power systems. Includes wind energy: resources, turbines, blades, rotor power characteristics, generators, active and reactive power, variability, and voltage regulation

Analysis, design, and construction of a solar-powered car for national competitions involving other universities. Study of electrical, mechanical, and aerodynamic systems.

Design principles in microwave and radio frequency systems; transmission lines and waveguides; S-parameter representation; impedance matching; microwave network analysis; microwave devices and components; electromagnetic effects in high-speed/high-frequency applications.

Principles of acoustics, with applications drawn from audio engineering, biomedical ultrasound, industrial acoustics, noise control, room acoustics, and underwater sound.

Introduction to the engineering design process; assessing engineering problems and customer needs; acquiring, documenting, and verifying requirements; high-level system design principles; effects of economic, environmental, ethical, safety, and social issues in design; writing design specifications.

First course in a two-semester sequence that concludes with Electrical Engineering 464S.

Business organization; discounted cash flow calculations, including present-worth and rate-of-return calculations; replacement analyses; financial analyses; accounting and depreciation; income taxes; inflation; risk analysis, utility theory, decision models, sequential decision making; value of information.

Fundamentals of risk management, including portfolio theory, capital asset pricing theory, and optimal project mix; hedging financial risk; advanced economic analysis of alternative energy systems; and advanced mathematical modeling techniques for economic analysis.

Statistical analysis applied to the development and control of manufacturing operations; quality control, statistical process control, and design of experiments. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 351K with a grade of at least C-.

Fundamentals of power systems emphasized through laboratory experiments; complex power, three-phase circuits, per-unit system, transformers, synchronous machines, transmission line models, steady-state analysis, induction machines, capacitor banks, protective relaying, surge arrestors, and instru

Three-phase power systems, system component models, symmetrical components, and admittance and impedance matrices. Formulation and analysis of loadflow, short circuit, and stability for electric grids. Economic operation.

Theory, principles, and practices for protecting medium-voltage industrial power systems and high-voltage transmission grids.

Introduction to modern control theory, nonlinear and optimal control systems; controllability, observability, stability; state feedback, observers, eigenvalue assignment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Analysis and design of linear discrete time control systems; z-transform theory; modified z-transforms; stability; multirate systems; digital simulation of discrete time systems; synthesis of algorithms for computer controllers. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Applications of automation techniques to manufacturing systems; robotics and computer vision. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 362K with a grade of at least C-.

Structures for industrial robots; geometry and transformation; direct and inverse kinematics; differential kinematics; dynamics; trajectory planning; actuators and sensors; adaptive control and learning compliance; vision and pattern recognition; expert systems.

Characteristics of artificial neural networks, feedforward networks, and recurrent networks; learning algorithms; self-organization; biological links; data mining and other applications. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Analog and digital modulation; noise in communication systems; signal-to-noise ratio; coding; optimal receiver design; phase-locked loops; and performance analysis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Digital image acquisition, processing, and analysis; algebraic and geometric image transformations; two-dimensional Fourier analysis; image filtering and coding.

Local, metropolitan, and wide-area operations; telecommunication common carrier organization and services; administrative and political considerations; premise distribution systems; name resolution, address assignment, and mail; datagrams, packets, frames, and cells; addressing and network-level

Circuit and packet-switched networks; local area networks; protocol stacks; ATM and broadband ISDN; Internet; routing, congestion control, and performance evaluation; multimedia applications.

Distributed information system security; cryptographic tools; authentication; message security; system management. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 325K or 340L with a grade of at least C-.

Application of electrical engineering principles in the design of electronic instrumentation at the circuit-board level for the measurement of pressure, temperature, flow, and impedance.

An in-depth examination of selected topics in biomedical engineering, such as optical and thermal properties of laser interaction with tissue; measurement of perfusion in the microvascular system; diagnostic imaging; interaction of living systems with electromagnetic fields; robotic surgical tools; ophthalmic instrumentation; noninvasive cardiovascular measurements.

Same as Engineering Studies 377E. Restricted to engineering students. Projects must differ significantly from those developed for Electrical Engineering 364D and 364E.

Course on various topics in Electrical Engineering

Capacitance and inductance; first- and second-order transient circuit response, including operational amplifier circuits; sinusoidal steady state analysis; Bode plots; complex power in single and balanced three-phase systems; transformers; two-port networks (Z-parameters and Y-parameters); and computer-aided analysis and design.

Methods for engineering software with a focus on abstraction; specification, design, implementation, and testing of object-oriented code using a modern development tool-set for complex systems; design and implementation of object-oriented programs in Java; abstract data types; inheritance; polymorphism; parameterized types and generic programming; the operation and application of commonly used data structures; exception handling and fault tolerance; introduction to algorithm analysis; teamwork models.

Analysis and design of electronic circuits using semiconductor devices. Basic device physics and small-signal modeling for diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors; operation region and biasing; basic switching circuits; single-stage and multi-stage amplifier design and analysis; input and output impedance characteristics of amplifiers; frequency response; AC and DC coupling techniques; differential amplifiers and output stages.

Analysis and design of analog electronic circuits; transistor models; single-ended amplifiers; differential amplifiers; operational amplifiers ; frequency response; feedback theory; stability analysis; circuit nonidealities; op-amp-based circuits; output stages; power amplifiers; passive and active analog filters; and relaxation oscillators.

Integrated circuit processing; crystal growth and wafer preparation; epitaxial growth; oxidation, diffusion, and ion implantation; thin-film deposition techniques; and lithography and etching.

Design of microcontroller-based embedded systems; interfacing from both a hardware and software perspective; and applications, including audio, data acquisition, and communication systems.

Embedded microcomputer systems; implementation of multitasking, synchronization, protection, and paging; operating systems for embedded microcomputers; design, optimization, evaluation, and simulation of digital and analog interfaces; real-time microcomputer software; and applications, including

Architectures of programmable digital signal processors; programming for real-time performance; design and implementation of digital filters, modulators, data scramblers, pulse shapers, and modems in real time; and interfaces to telecommunication systems.

Organization, design, simulation, synthesis, and testing of digital systems; hardware description languages (HDLs); field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs); hardware implementation of arithmetic and other algorithmic processes; state machine charts; microprogramming; and microprocessor design.

Characteristics of instruction set architecture and microarchitecture; physical and virtual memory; caches and cache design; interrupts and exceptions; integer and floating-point arithmetic; I/O processing; buses; pipelining, out-of-order execution, branch prediction, and other performance enhancements; design trade-offs; case studies of commercial microprocessors. Laboratory work includes completing the behavioral-level design of a microarchitecture.

Theory and practice of very-large-scale integration (VLSI) circuit design.

The design and development of large-scale software systems using automated analysis tools. Generation of concrete software engineering artifacts at all stages of the software life-cycle. Design principles and methods; design and modeling tools; collaborative development environment; object-oriented design and analysis; design patterns and refactoring; integration and testing tools; debugger and bug finder; program comprehension; software life-cycle and evolution.

Analysis, design, and operation of power electronic circuits; power conversion from AC to DC, DC to DC, and DC to AC; rectifiers, inverters, and pulse width modulated motor drives. Laboratory work focuses on the use of energy from renewable sources such as photovoltaics and wind.

Design and experimental projects done with teams of students from multiple engineering disciplines; the ethics of design for safety and reliability; emphasis on written and oral reporting of engineering projects.

Restricted to students in the Engineering Honors Program. Design and experimental projects done under the direction of a University faculty member; the ethics of design for safety and reliability; emphasis on written and oral reporting of engineering projects.

Design and experimental projects done in Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering laboratories; the ethics of design for safety and reliability; emphasis on written and oral reporting of engineering projects.

Design and experimental projects done under the supervision of a University faculty member; the ethics of design for safety and reliability; emphasis on written and oral reporting of engineering projects.

Continuation of Electrical Engineering 364E. Completion of a practical engineering product design; validation of the design through prototype construction and testing, modeling and simulation, and manufacturability analysis.

The fundamentals of wireless communication from a digital signal processing perspective; linear modulation, demodulation, and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing; synchronization, channel estimation, and equalization; communication in fading channels; and wireless standards.

Research performed during two consecutive semesters under the supervision of an engineering faculty member; topics are selected jointly by the student and the faculty member with approval by the director of the Engineering Honors Program.

Research performed during two consecutive semesters under the supervision of an engineering faculty member; topics are selected jointly by the student and the faculty member with approval by the director of the Engineering Honors Program.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Elective course open to upper-division students in electrical engineering for original investigation of special problems approved by the department. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit.